[PDF] ë Unlimited ✓ Mexican Enough: My Life between the Borderlines : by Stephanie Elizondo Griest ↠
Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM By Stephanie Elizondo Griest

Growing up in a half white, half brown town and family in South Texas, Stephanie Elizondo Griest struggled with her cultural identity Upon turning thirty, she ventured to her mother s native Mexico to do some root searching and stumbled upon a social movement that shook the nation to its core Mexican Enough chronicles her adventures rumbling with luchadores professionalGrowing up in a half white, half brown town and family in South Texas, Stephanie Elizondo Griest struggled with her cultural identity Upon turning thirty, she ventured to her mother s native Mexico to do some root searching and stumbled upon a social movement that shook the nation to its core Mexican Enough chronicles her adventures rumbling with luchadores professional wrestlers , marching with rebel teachers in Oaxaca, investigating the murder of a prominent gay activist, and sneaking into a prison to meet with indigenous resistance fighters She also visits families of the undocumented workers she befriended back home Travel mates include a Polish thief, a Border Patrol agent, and a sultry dominatrix Part memoir, part journalistic reportage, Mexican Enough illuminates how we cast off our identity in our youth, only to strive to find it again as adults and the lessons to be learned along the way.
  • Title: Mexican Enough: My Life between the Borderlines
  • Author: Stephanie Elizondo Griest
  • ISBN: 9781416540175
  • Page: 379
  • Format: Paperback

Comments

Michael Andersen-Andrade Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
This is the story of an American woman who goes to Mexico as an adult to discover her Mexican heritage and learn Spanish. I really wanted to like this book---I learned to love Mexico and to speak Spanish as an adult, too---but it is so full of cliches and sophmoric observations that I was frequently irritated while reading it. I also found the author's constant mid-sentence translations of even the most basic words to be annoying.
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Celeste Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
I wanted to read this books because I had been interested in perhaps writing a memoir or a long article about my life as a Tejana, family ancestors (as they were part of Texas history), and other things. Griest is from Corpus and my generation so I thought it would be good to read her memoir and see what she wrote about so that if I chose to do one of my own I wouldn't repeat things that she already had mentioned. Once I got to the end I realized that though we were both born around the same tim [...]
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Grace Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
I have the same ethnic background as Ms. Griest and thought "yes! This is the book I've been waiting for!" Maybe I went in with too high of expectations but this book to me, was not one of self-discovery as much as it was a journalist reporting back on lucha libre, gay rights in Mexico and the Zapatistas. All of these are valid topics and I have interest in them but the reason I picked up this particular book was to read about her personal changes as she traveled and lived in Mexico. I was upset [...]
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Liz Murray Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
I'm not sure exactly how I feel about this book. I respect the fact the author brought up the complexities of Mexican society and did not shy away from talking about the many human rights abuses going on within Mexican society that the author seems to see as hidden from many outside the country (probably not too false an assumption). While the author was searching for her own cultural roots I felt the whole way through that she was as much a tourist in this country as anyone else visiting. Incid [...]
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Priscilla Macias Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
I was skeptical reading this book because I usually have a hard time identifying with books about Mexican American women (I myself am a Mexican American woman). Either it's too hard-core Mexican or too watered down and portrays women in a "I'm a part of the earth and the water" type of deal. I am personally not that type of Mexican American women, so I always approach these types of books with caution and am a pretty hard sell. However, I read the book and I related to it WAY more than I expecte [...]
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Deirdre Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
When she finally buried her shovel in Mexican soil she had no idea how rich the ground might be. No longer satisfied with simply being considered a Latina on applications, Griest, who learned Russian to travel in the former Soviet Union and Chinese to live in China, decided it was finally time to learn Spanish by traveling Mexico.In her best and most heartfelt book yet, Griest documents both her amazing process of embracing the wild, dangerous, loving, and enthralling calliope that is Mexico and [...]
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Stephanie Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
I am ashamed to admit that I know next to nothing about Mexico's political history other than the current dispute about Mexican immigrants. Stephanie Griest's book was extremely informative and entertaining.I now know more than I wanted to know about the corruption and political oppression of Mexico's minorities from its gay citizens to its indigenous Indian population. I also understand how NAFTA has hurt and not helped improve the lives of all Mexicans. I especially like this author's journali [...]
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Angee Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
I didnt really enjoy this book at all. she claims to be on a journey to find her heritage but in reality she goes with an bad perception of the country and spend the entire time finding the bad in a culture she knows nothing about. She doesnt make the effort to be open-minded and in the end finds nothing of her heritage.I wouldnt recommend reading this book its a waste of time and personally, reading this book just put me in a bad mood.
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Elisa Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
there are lots of different levels of this book:1. What's it like to be Mexican2. What's it like for those of Mexican heritage to be treated by Mexicans and fellow US citizens3. Immigration4. Class Issues5. Gay Rights6. RacismThis is such a great book that touches on so many different topics that are also part of a wanderlust's desire to travel. What I really enjoyed was the authors honesty at her faux pas, mistakes and smalls humblings.
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Sandra Hernandez Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
Growing up as a Chicana myself, I related to Stephanie's quest through out the journey that was her book. I was sad when I was done reading as I hope to live vicariously through her stories. The book also reminded me of how "white-washed" I truly am and, on a different level, how Mexican I can be.
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Courtney Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
Growing up in Texas and working as a photojournalist there, I felt a connection to the places and the events the author mentioned. Her perspective was interesting, and I like that she shared multiple stories that did not present her in a positive light. Overall, the message throughout the book about our search for identity, our desire to categorize others and ourselves, and the recognition of how impossible that is was appreciated.
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Drew Potts Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
A good into the world of our students who cross borders, cultures and families. It is the story of a woman who at 30 years old decides to go visit her mother's native Mexico and do some searching for her roots. She actually becomes part of a social movement that changed the shape of Mexico. She has adventures with a Polish thief, a Border Patrol agent, and a dominatrix as well as some resistance fighters and gay activists. Where did she fit into the cultural mosaic? When was she Mexican or Ameri [...]
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Janine Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
The authors accounts of her travels through Mexico were interesting. The curious thing was that her route almost coincided with mine. I was on tour through Oaxaca and Chiapas in September 2006 and must have missed her by a few weeks only as she returned for her second trip. Her focus was directed towards political and socio-cultural aspects of Mexico, which captured my interest. I recall seeing the independent elegidos in Chiapas, but did not venture into them nor did I have enough historical ba [...]
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Jessica Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
I picked this book up at the library looking for something to keep my attention. Knowing how much I enjoy biographies and memoirs, I strolled though that section and when I saw this title, I grabbed the book off of the shelf; when I saw the cover, I remembered seeing this book in an article in Latina magazine entitled, "Books Every Latina Should Read." I am not Mexican, I am not Latina, I am, however, a Spanish teacher who has lived in Mexico and who also struggles with cultural identity. I poin [...]
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Nicole Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
Stephanie Griest definitely has more of a journalistic style of writing. Usually, just stating the facts without much elaboration. She reports with careful distance and detachment. I appreciate that she doesn't sidestep the machismo issue. It frustrates me that the prevalent machismo behavior is too often ignored or swept under the rug. It's a BIG problem!! So, kudos to Griest for calling it out, however briefly. This is huge here, men coming home after months away and then beating their wives. [...]
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Eduardo Sanchez Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
Mexican Enough is a book made by a lady called Stephanie Elizondo Griest and this lady is telling her story right now of how when she was little she had difficulties growing up as a half mexican and how hard she found to compare herself to this different culture, since she was little she saw how Hispanic students had an enormous amount of help in school and she took advantage of that while applying to colleges. Years later while traveling through the Arizona desert she had a vision of a Mexican [...]
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Cathi Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
This is a book I'd never heard of, until a friend recommended it. She read it for a college class in Houston, Texas, and she was able to meet the writer, as well. While I didn't absolutely love the book, I liked the writing style, which was very personal, easy-to-read, and full of unexpected humor and honesty. There were a couple of extremely vulgar spots in the book, with foul language that I could have done without, but overall, it was very well written and worthwhile. I'm grateful for all tha [...]
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Nikki Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
I read this book my sophomore year of college and it struck such a chord with me that I've kept the same copy with my through 4 moves and getting married.This story is the narrative of the author as she gets back to her roots in Mexico. She is half Mexican and half white and throughout her whole life has felt torn between those two cultures. The journey she takes is an attempt to find peace with one half of her heritage.She travels all over Mexico, learning the language, meeting (and living with [...]
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Harry Brake Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
There are so may lists I have made mentally on where I NEED to go within Mexico after reading this - the woven knowledge that Stephanie Elizondo Griest receives in trying to recover a past that she feels she needs to make up for, the information she shares is priceless. At times it seems she expects too much to return to Mexico and pick up the pieces, even after a long haul, but the realization she stumbles upon at the end? - priceless and reality at its best. So many discrepancies in cultural p [...]
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Lesley Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
Having attended UNAM in Mexico City and spent much time visiting Mexico over the years, I was completely ignorant to the humans rights violations perpetrated by the Mexican government until reading this book. From violence and harassment suffered by homosexuals, forced confessions to solve crimes (via torture and threats to loved ones), hired thugs to repress strikes, stealing of newspapers before they reach readers, and the cruel and inhumane treatment of the indigenous population - this author [...]
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Oscar Romero Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
This is an amazing book. Stephanie is pretty gutsy to be willing to go into many places not many of us would daret even if the story was worth telling. However, I do think all her stories are awesome and give us an interesting and powerful insight in what is going on in Mexico and in USA.I very much enjoyed her stories and her facts about people working in USA as illegalsd her willingness to go and visit their relatives in Mexico. It is nice to see that and I am sure everyone appreciates itI wou [...]
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Justin Gaynor Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
I've read a large number of books about North Americans in Mexico, and this one belongs on a short list of favorites. The author, who seems to be up for pretty much anything, moves down there with some familial introductions and begins the process of learning Spanish while also learning about other ways of life. Most books about Mexico either fall into the poor-but-noble-peon-teaching-us-a-better-way-of-life or beer-soaked party memoirs, but what makes Griest's book so interesting is that she mo [...]
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Monica Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
hmmm 3 or 4 stars? I dunno. Anyway, I really liked this book. The author, the journalist Elizondo Griest, goes to Mexico in search of her Mexican roots (she's half Mexican and half German, and grew up in Texas). She begins her trip in Queretero with a group of Mexican gay men, and later visits Chiapas, the border areas, and Oaxaca, el D.F as well as other places I've likely forgotten. Good discussion of the Zapatistas and the Oaxacan uprisings, which I was not expecting in this book. Interesting [...]
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Amy Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
Great introduction to Mexico for those who know little about the country and its people. Elizondo Griest gives a diverse overview of Mexican life which piques the interest and provides excellent starting points for future research. I was particularly chilled by her chapter "Malaleche" about the women artists who created a visual project to document the femicides in Ciudad Juarez. Also, Elizondo Griest takes an intimate look at the indigenous peoples of Mexico, how immigration from Mexico to the [...]
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Crystal Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
Griest spends a year in Mexico in an attempt to connect with her Mexican roots. Her mother is Mexican and her father is a white man from Kansas. When she was young she chose to associate more with her U.S. culture and didn't learn Spanish or dig too deeply into her mother's culture. The book reads in a disjointed way as Griest bounces from one political hot spot to another during her travels. She can't quite ignore her journalistic tendencies as she struggles through her own cultural issues. Thi [...]
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Linda Doyle Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
Initially I chose to read this book because I believed it to be a tale of a young woman's personal struggle with her cultural identity. Though the writer does address this topic, the bulk of the book focuses on Mexican identity, on the people of Mexico and their struggles with political rule and the economy. It's a revealing study of the Mexican psyche that ultimately leads the author to a better understanding of herself. It is very well written but I found some of the chapters more captivating [...]
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Cindy Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
The title itself drew me to this book. As a daughter of a Mexican mother and an Anglo-American father, I used to wonder if I was more Mexican or more Anglo and finding a book like this makes me feel like I'm not the only one. For some reason I thought this book would be more of the author finding her identity and who she is - and so far I'm encountering more of a journalistic feel to it which makes sense because Griest is a journalist. She writes about what is happening at the time from a journa [...]
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Dorothy Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
The author, who grew up in Corpus Christi, writes about her travels in interior Mexico as well as along the border between Texas and Mexico. She goes to remote villages where most of the men are in El Norte (the U.S.) working and sending money home for their families as even at our minimum wage, they can make more money than in their own country. Mexican politics affect even the poorest people and she also tells us about that and in way too much detail for me. All in all, it was an interesting b [...]
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Bilingual Librarian Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
This is an interesting book, although it really only scratched the surface of the many issues it tried to explore. The main thrust behind Griest’s time abroad was to discover her roots, and while it seems she got a better view of Mexico than she ever had before, what struck me was her own sense at the futility of the quest. Throughout the book she is constantly commenting how she just can’t seem to get the subtleties the culture has to offer.Read more atbilinguallibrarian/200
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Lilly Nov 14, 2018 - 09:22 AM
This book provided me with so much brain food. It took me so long to get through it because I would read a few pages and then just sit and let all the words on the page marinate in my head. It triggered so many memories of my own travels across Mexico, my own personal conflicts with being Mexican enough. I think the writing is just OK, but the content was more than enough to keep me flipping the page. I wish she'd write another book already.
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Mexican Enough: My Life between the Borderlines By Stephanie Elizondo Griest Growing up in a half white, half brown town and family in South Texas, Stephanie Elizondo Griest struggled with her cultural identity Upon turning thirty, she ventured to her mother s native Mexico to do some root searching and stumbled upon a social movement that shook the nation to its core Mexican Enough chronicles her adventures rumbling with luchadores professionalGrowing up in a half white, half brown town and family in South Texas, Stephanie Elizondo Griest struggled with her cultural identity Upon turning thirty, she ventured to her mother s native Mexico to do some root searching and stumbled upon a social movement that shook the nation to its core Mexican Enough chronicles her adventures rumbling with luchadores professional wrestlers , marching with rebel teachers in Oaxaca, investigating the murder of a prominent gay activist, and sneaking into a prison to meet with indigenous resistance fighters She also visits families of the undocumented workers she befriended back home Travel mates include a Polish thief, a Border Patrol agent, and a sultry dominatrix Part memoir, part journalistic reportage, Mexican Enough illuminates how we cast off our identity in our youth, only to strive to find it again as adults and the lessons to be learned along the way.

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  • [PDF] ë Unlimited ✓ Mexican Enough: My Life between the Borderlines : by Stephanie Elizondo Griest ↠
    379 Stephanie Elizondo Griest
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ë Unlimited ✓ Mexican Enough: My Life between the Borderlines : by Stephanie Elizondo Griest ↠
    Posted by:Stephanie Elizondo Griest
    Published :2018-08-09T09:22:33+00:00