The Ethics/Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect/Selected Letters
Baruch Spinoza Seymour Feldman Samuel Shirley
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Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM By Baruch Spinoza Seymour Feldman Samuel Shirley

Since their publications in 1982, Samuel Shirley s translations of Spinoza s Ethics and Selected Letters have been commended for their accuracy and readability Now with the addition of his new translation of Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect this enlarged edition will be even useful to students of Spinoza s thought.
  • Title: The Ethics/Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect/Selected Letters
  • Author: Baruch Spinoza Seymour Feldman Samuel Shirley
  • ISBN: 9780872201309
  • Page: 467
  • Format: Paperback

Comments

N. Goldman Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
Spinoza is the most systematic and reasoned thinker of the Rationalists. His ethics is a huge set of definitions, axioms, propositions, proofs, and corollaries in a bizarre format called the "geometrical" style, loosely based on the very rigid and sequential nature of mathematical proofs. His systematic approach leads him to some very unusual conclusions about the nature of God, the human being and its relation to the world, and his ultimate ethical imperatives, but it is nonetheless a very orig [...]
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Suzanne Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
In my admittedly spotty philosophy education (both of the formal and self variety) very scant attention has been given to Baruch Spinoza. Much to my detriment. I have struggled with the ideas presented by Aristotle, Augustine, Boethius, Aquinas, Luther, Bacon, Pascal, and Descartes; both as it pertains to comprehending them and accepting them once I had reached some level of comprehension.Spinoza's is the first theory of existence that seemed remotely plausible in its refusal to default to doctr [...]
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January Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
My dad was a Presbyterian minister who discovered Spinoza quite accidentally and late in life and never looked back. So my childhood was spent listening to my dad quote Spinoza in response to almost any question I ever asked. When I left for college my dad's gift to me was the Dover editions of the Elwes translation of the "Ethics" and the "Theologico-Political Treatise," with an exhortation to always read the unfinished "Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect" before reading either major w [...]
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Julian Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
good, but too many triangle analogies
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Kelly Head Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
The first thing to understand about Spinoza’s ethical philosophy is that he holds a deterministic view of the universe (“Nature”), and consequently denies free decision. A bit odd, you might think, to have a moral view of the universe if everything is determined to be the way it is--and I would agree with you. However, despite the lack of choice in his moral philosophy, he can still write some beautiful things about love. In the passage below, you get a glimpse of his influence on Nietzsch [...]
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Val Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
Fun for reading but not for discussing
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Jane Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
Spinoza has taught me how to write really foolproof arguments. Step 1: When defining your terms at the beginning of your argument, make sure your definitions are super strong and assertive. You don't have to explain why your definitions of substance or affection or God are a certain way because they're, like, you know. Definitions. Step 2: Draw some conclusions based on those definitions. Your conclusions will be pretty much indisputable, no matter how weird or extreme they sound, because your r [...]
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Tom Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
This is easily my favorite philosophical work and the one I most closely identify with. My favorite because of the reverence with which he treats his subject matter, the respect he accords it. He isn't flippant with his utterances - this isn't Nietzsche, although Nietzsche was a fan of his. He organizes the work like Euclid's Elements, with definitions, axioms and theorems, and tries to "derive" philosophical truths.
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C Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
I'm partial to Hackett versions of philosophical classics. They're inexpensive and the translations are often very good, or minimally,vetted by some of the best living scholars on the philosopher or book. Great edition of a still undervalued and underread book. It's almost all in here. Everything. You know what I'm talking about. Everything.
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David Markwell Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
Spinoza's Ethics and the Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect is one of my favourite early modern philosophy books. Spinoza's arguments are well organised and laid out in geometric proofs, yet the book remains enjoyable to read. Spinoza is unique among philosophers of his time with his treatment on the emotions and their effect on the intellect.
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Julian Meynell Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
In my opinion the most important book ever written. It is very difficult for a nonprofessional philosopher to understand, however. It should probably only be read in conjunction with another book explaining it, if read outside of an academic context.This is not the best translation, although it is quite good. The Curley translation is better and readily available.
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Scott Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
I've been assured it's still relevant. I tend not to trust any philosophy pre-Marx and pre-Darwin. It all seems too metaphysical and tied to God. Let me have philosophy at some point after the understanding that humanity has not just plopped into this world in order to make sense of it. I still need to give it time.
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Sean Rife Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
I have great respect for Spinoza, but reading him makes my head hurt.
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Ian Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
Not my cup of tea. He makes all the mistakes Descartes made while being only slightly more interesting.
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Jaimi Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
My favorite book of philosophy, he is not brief, but does cover basically everything. Eat your heart out Kant
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Mistercaballerogmail.com Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
You must be patient and read carefully with an active reading mindset-- this is a philosophy book that is hard to follow.
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Alex Obrigewitsch Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
Spinoza is perhaps an example of the exile par excellence. He was excommunicated from the Jewish community, and his work skirted the fringes outside of the popular Cartesian philosophy of his day. Not to mention that his thought is a dangerous thought, to the point that he could not publish it during his life, for fear of persecution (The Ethics at least, which is the heart of his thought); it was not published until after his death. Yet his thought is on the side of life, to the point of being [...]
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Matheus Alves Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
Woop woop! Big ups for the beings who spent their time carefully paying attention to the decision making, idea generation, concept internalization and critical thinking development. Big round of applause for all of those who, like Spinoza, put on paper an endless combinations of letters what you think throughout your day but never managed to carefully dissect.
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White Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
It was really difficult to get used to this early English writing. But after the first while, it became easier and easier. I guess you could equate it with Shakespeare, although the Kant was from an entirely different genre. Spinoza was from an era in European history before the empiricists. His writings were, therefore somewhat religious but very deep thinking in the nature of God and philosophical thought. I actually liked this piece because it was revealing about the new direction that philos [...]
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Ericka Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
Ok, so I'm writing my dissertation on Spinoza, which makes me biased, but in a good way. like I know something about it, and thus love it, not someone cool likes it and so i was like, me too! Ok, book 1 and 2, first time out -- read but don't get bogged down, for my $$ book 4 is where the payoff is, but you need to get through book 3 to get it, and you might learn something along the way. book 5 is not for the faint of theological heart -- valiant secularists, you can make it, but give the Big s [...]
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Jack Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
A sublime picture of the university and humanity's place within it. Even after discarding the outmoded ontology Spinoza utilizes, there is quite a bit that one can keep as a viable philosophy, if one were so inclined.
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Nicole Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
I registered a book at BookCrossing!BookCrossing/journal/13497368
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Jessica Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
Technically, I didn't finish this, since we didn't have to read the whole thing buth. Too much word math, a bit of repetitive. Basically everything Discourse on Method wasn't.
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Austen Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
A life-changing path through eternity.
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William West Jan 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM
Only read Ethics, but it was interesting.
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The Ethics/Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect/Selected Letters By Baruch Spinoza Seymour Feldman Samuel Shirley Since their publications in 1982, Samuel Shirley s translations of Spinoza s Ethics and Selected Letters have been commended for their accuracy and readability Now with the addition of his new translation of Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect this enlarged edition will be even useful to students of Spinoza s thought.

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  • [PDF] Download ↠ The Ethics/Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect/Selected Letters | by Î Baruch Spinoza Seymour Feldman Samuel Shirley
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    Published :2018-03-19T12:34:41+00:00