á The Narcissist Next Door: Understanding the Monster in Your Family, in Your Office, in Your Bed--in Your World || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Jeffrey Kluger
Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM By Jeffrey Kluger

From an award winning senior writer at Time, an eye opening exploration of narcissism, how to recognize it, and how to handle it The odds are good that you know a narcissist probably a lot of them The odds are also good that they are intelligent, confident, and articulate the center of attention They make you laugh and they make you think The odds are also that this spFrom an award winning senior writer at Time, an eye opening exploration of narcissism, how to recognize it, and how to handle it The odds are good that you know a narcissist probably a lot of them The odds are also good that they are intelligent, confident, and articulate the center of attention They make you laugh and they make you think The odds are also that this spell didn t last.Narcissists are everywhere There are millions of them in the United States alone entertainers, politicians, business people, your neighbors Recognizing and understanding them is crucial to your not being overtaken by them, says Jeffrey Kluger, in his provocative new book about this insidious disorder.With insight and wit, Kluger frames the surprising new research on narcissism and explains the complex, exasperating personality disorder He reveals how narcissism and narcissists affect our lives at work and at home, on the road, and in the halls of government what to do when we encounter narcissism and how to neutralize its effects before it s too late.As a Time writer and science editor, Kluger knows how to take science s new ideas and transform them into smart, accessible insights Highly readable and deeply engaging, this book helps us understand narcissism and narcissists fully.
  • Title: The Narcissist Next Door: Understanding the Monster in Your Family, in Your Office, in Your Bed--in Your World
  • Author: Jeffrey Kluger
  • ISBN: 9781594486364
  • Page: 465
  • Format: Hardcover

Comments

Douglas Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Thank you to Riverhead Books and for advance copy. It's very difficult for me to write anything negative about a book that's currently being promoted by a publisher. Times are hard, and I want to encourage book sales, not discourage. Very sorry. Jeffrey Kluger is a fine writer - succinct, entertaining, and fluid. I would be very interested to read his other books. Here's the problem I have with this one. Anecdote after anecdote of what Kluger determines is narcissism is based on the person's ac [...]
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Kristina Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
What I find rather amusing about Jeffrey Kluger’s The Narcissist Next Door: Understanding the Monster in Your Family, In Your Office, in Your Bed—In Your World is that there’s a certain amount of name dropping in the book: his name. It’s understandable that he would mention his own experiences with (supposed) narcissists, but he seems like the narcissist himself in his own stories about dealing with a narcissist. Indeed, in the afterword, he does call himself an “incipient narcissist [...]
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Michelle Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Love of the self to the exclusion of others produces its own kind of sorrow ~ Jeffery KlugerNarcissism, is the topic of this highly informative and easily understood without the intense scientific data; and deeply personal advice/how to avoid: instead, author Jeffery Kluger engages the reader in: "The Narcissist Next Door: Understanding the Monster in your Family, in Your Office In Your Bed, in Your World". This is an excellent captivating narrative which identifies behaviors and characteristics [...]
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John Gurney Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
The Narcissist Next Door is well-written and widely researched, yet, meanders and is primarily about politicians and celebrities. Author Jeffrey Kluger diagoses from afar, which is unsettling. He simply labels stars like Charlie Sheen, Justin Beiber, Alec Baldwin and pols like Bill Clinton, Lyndon Baines Johnson, and Sarah Palin as narcissists. Maybe, but Kluger is not a psychologist. He also lumps very different people together. The sexting Anthony Weiner and the homicidal Hitler, Stalin, Mao a [...]
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Emily Crow Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
The book defines narcissism so broadly that anyone who engages in sexting or exhibitionism, aspires to political office or is routinely rude or stuck on themselves could be included. Also racism and sports fanaticism are tied in as being part of "cultural narcissism." As a result, I felt that this book was unfocused and shallow, with too much reliance on evolutionary pop psychology as an explanation (alpha males and dominance-except that really isn't what narcissism is about.) There was also a l [...]
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Emily Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Although the book kept me interested throughout it's pages, it did not, in fact, help me understand the monster in my family, in my office, and in my bed. The author presents opinions about a swathe of phenomenons, from celebrity personality to evolution, and tangentially relates each of these to narcissism. Everything can be related back to narcissism if you think hard enough, because there is an innate need to preserve yourself that is self-explanatory. In addition, the author diagnoses almost [...]
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Kristin Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
I received an advance copy of this book through Penguin's First to Read program. Although I generally shy away from the "pop psychology" genre, I am glad I gave this one a try. First, I should warn that if you are looking for a book on the clinical, personality disorder of narcissism, this book may not be for you. Rather, The Narcissist Next Door provides a broad view of the trait of narcissism and how it has infiltrated the American society. What I found fascinating was how the author applied n [...]
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Donna Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
This was probably 3.5 stars for me. I rounded up only because I felt sorry that the GR rating was so low. Okay, this book needs to be read with a grain of salt. Once I could do that, I enjoyed it. If you are looking for scientific and clinical accuracy, as well as study after study, this is NOT the book for you. The author starts out railing on Donald Trump. A lot of celebrities, politicians, and even some businesses were not spared from the 'all knowing narcissism finger'. That was kind of humo [...]
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Amanda [Novel Addiction] Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
This was certainly interesting, but not what I expected. I still do not have a good idea of how to deal with a narcissist, nor do I really understand them. Maybe a better subtitle would be "this is what a narcissist will probably do in these situations" not "understanding narcissists in these situations." Oy. Still though, fascinating reading if you enjoy human behavior.
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Charlene Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Pros: - Kluger took an integrated global and local approach to understanding narcism. For example, ingroup/outgroup thinking in war, sports teams, personal relationships. - He did a great job at times of using critical thinking and writing skills when discussing twin studies, as well as some other studies. - The chapter on relationships was fantastic. - One main point from the relationship chapter was that ongoing self-centered and exploitive behavior is as damaging as many other types of recogn [...]
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Mary Ronan Drew Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Narcissism is on the rise, says Jeffrey Kluger, the author of The Narcissist Next Door, in part because of the educational theories of recent years that demand a prize for everyone to assure each student he is special. But self-esteem is one thing and the ridiculous pampering of the egos of young people is another and the latter is dangerous.There are lots of statistics in the book, my favorite being the study that tells us 80% of American youth think they are in the top 10 percent of students i [...]
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Laren Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
There was far too much name dropping of celebrities presumed to be narcissistic although the author doesn't know any of them personally and therefore can't be sure that any of them truly meet the clinical definition of a narcissist. Personally I don't think that such "armchair" diagnoses are a good idea, especially if you base them on only one or two examples from their lives. There is also very little information on how to deal with any narcissists in your life, although it does showcase exampl [...]
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Hester Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
I would have given this book a 1, but it is so much better than "Monsters International" that I would have felt dirty.Years ago I read "The Sociopath Next Door." It was fantastic, so I went in with artificially high expectations. Unfortunately, the book seems to be an excuse for Mr. Kluger to string together whatever he finds interesting while pretending to be interested in narcissism. I finished the book unsure he even understood what it was. Deeply disappointing.
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Jonathan Rocks Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
I thought this would be an interesting read. I was wrong. It's hard to take the author seriously when his personal bias and petty snark consistently get in the way of an otherwise interesting topic.Narcissists come in all shapes and sizes, but Kluger seems to pick and choose the ones to defend and make excuses for.Hell, he leaves other *glaring* examples out of the text almost completely. That's just odd. Or willfully ignorant.A disappointing read.
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Laura Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Not as helpful as I would have hoped for dealing with the narcissists in my life.
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Sarah Hyatt Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
If you want to understand narcissism, this is a terrible book. I would venture so far as to say this may be a dangerous book. This is the book equivalent of an essay written by a student during an all nighter at the end of finals week. In the interest of full disclosure, I read one chapter and had to put it down. I skimmed the others. I am also not qualified to diagnose anyone - though Kluger does, repeatedly, and he relies on celebrities. He settles for the shallow, often wrong, assumption that [...]
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Ruby Noise Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Makes me ponder whether narcissism is just another label people want to place on someone, or is it just bad manners. Good tips on recognising the narcissist, though life teaches you the same lessons over time if you care to listen. I must admit though it was the best dedication I've read "To Me." I had to complete the NPI (Narcissistic Personality Inventory) in the back of the book and apparently I have self-esteem issues.To the makers of such tests, I say fuck you, I love myself and my sense of [...]
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Shira Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
This was an invaluable book to read and provided important insights into several situations I've had to deal with. Understanding that there are actually at least two main types of npd put certain persons into perspective for me which had been a quandry in terms of how to view and deal with these people. Very useful book, sadly.
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Tina Panik Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
"Narcissists are, in a sense, emotional muggers, people who assault their victims with a combination of stealth and misdirection." ( 253). This book does an excellent job of defining the line between over confidence and narcissism, and provides solid advice for dealing with this at work.
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Yulenka Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
This was a good book. Kluger writes with a kind of dry sense of humour which I appreciated. I did find that he spent way too much time making examples of the presidents, as he referred to them as if his readers knew their personalities by default. As a non-american, I did not. He also took some pretty damn leisurely strolls around semi-related points and that got frustrating. The tangents didn't really give value to the original point but you still ended up reading through them hoping they'd rel [...]
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Claudia Aroni Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Dear Narcissists of the past, you charmed the pants off of me, made me questioned my value and sanity but at the end taught me a very valuable lesson: I am enough so thank you for the lesson. Dear Narcissists of the present, enjoy it while it lasts because I am quietly planning my exit strategy. You won't see it coming and that's perfectly fine with me. Dear Narcissists of the future, we'll have our "Clinton charm" encounter sooner or later and for those very seconds I will enjoy the spotlight; [...]
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Ally Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
"They are all volatile spirits. they effervesce and enliven or they singe and scald. the difference is in knowing how to control them." This book put flesh on the bones of what i know about narcissists; there is a lot of description about what they are like and how to recognise them, a little about why they are like that, but little about what to do with them. Like what others have told me, there's not much you can do to change them, often the solution is to avoid or get rid of them. i was hopin [...]
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Marta Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
A lot of sub-topics are introduced, but there is a lack of depth to any of the chapters. Uuthor Kluger would name famous people that he claims are narcissists. It actually seems to fit the actions he describes of narcissists to be neither a psychologist or personally close to the people named and claim this kind of knowledge, as well as be unconcerned about their feelings.In the back is a quiz to rate your narcissistic tendencies. But here's the deal: a score of 17 or above means you are, "flirt [...]
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Amy Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Very interesting and tackles narcissism not just as a clinical disorder but also in its milder form as a mindset that can reward people professionally (if not in their relationships). The major problem I found in this book was the liberal use of celebrity examples when many of these people likely do not suffer from narcissism (certainly not in the clinical sense). I understand the author was looking for examples of BEHAVIORS, but it's easy to see it as labeling people instead, especially when ot [...]
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Melissa Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
I got a Kindle for Christmas and somehow it has turned into a teen/chic-lit only library. I wanted to read something about characters over the age of 21 who were not dying of cancer or deciding whether to go to Juilliard without their "one true love." I read this book because narcissism is such a common theme nowadays. Jeff is a great writer and gives interesting examples of celebrities who are narcissists (hello Donald Trump.) The section on how all human beings are born narcissists in order to [...]
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Jennifer Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Of all weeks to pick up this book and read the first chapter about Donald Trump's narcissism. Really? Who knew?Though this book is somewhat dated which is fine because the personality disorder of narcissism transcends time, I found it tiresome that almost every celebrity, athlete, person in the public eye has been "diagnosed." Instead of a People magazine approach, I was hoping to get real life examples. The teacher next door, a relative at the family reunion, etc. Using celebrity examples made [...]
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Deirdre Keating Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
An impulse grab at the library, and ultimately disappointing. The subtitle is very misleading. Instead it is more of a (somewhat mean-spirited) series of profiles of well known narcissists (LBJ, Steve Jobs), though I think it is dangerous to throw around the term even on larger-than-life characters. The most interesting part for me was the situation that Kluger identified as his own slight step toward narcissism (I so wanna know who the editor was).
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Elise Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
This book was very informative. I underlined a LOT of the book in my kindle. I was glad that for the most part, the author did not rake Republicans across the coals, as is becoming a disturbing trend in some otherwise non-political books I have read lately. In all, the political bias of the author can only clearly be seen in 1-2 chapters, and the rest of the book was so balanced and informative that I decided to overlook the criticisms and take the bad with the good.
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Shana Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
Kluger is an editor and author, but not a psychologist or a psychiatrist, so if you're looking for an in-depth, academic read about narcissism, this will fall short. It is, however, a readable and well-rounded book that takes from various scientific studies and interesting anecdotes to explain the qualities of narcissism in places ranging from the White House to our workplaces.
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Pat Byrnes Mar 21, 2019 - 13:38 PM
The book has some good information, but it was written like one long magazine article. It was sort of a Who's Who of famous narcissist. I don't know what I was expecting, but I made it through with not much more knowledge than before.
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The Narcissist Next Door: Understanding the Monster in Your Family, in Your Office, in Your Bed--in Your World By Jeffrey Kluger From an award winning senior writer at Time, an eye opening exploration of narcissism, how to recognize it, and how to handle it The odds are good that you know a narcissist probably a lot of them The odds are also good that they are intelligent, confident, and articulate the center of attention They make you laugh and they make you think The odds are also that this spFrom an award winning senior writer at Time, an eye opening exploration of narcissism, how to recognize it, and how to handle it The odds are good that you know a narcissist probably a lot of them The odds are also good that they are intelligent, confident, and articulate the center of attention They make you laugh and they make you think The odds are also that this spell didn t last.Narcissists are everywhere There are millions of them in the United States alone entertainers, politicians, business people, your neighbors Recognizing and understanding them is crucial to your not being overtaken by them, says Jeffrey Kluger, in his provocative new book about this insidious disorder.With insight and wit, Kluger frames the surprising new research on narcissism and explains the complex, exasperating personality disorder He reveals how narcissism and narcissists affect our lives at work and at home, on the road, and in the halls of government what to do when we encounter narcissism and how to neutralize its effects before it s too late.As a Time writer and science editor, Kluger knows how to take science s new ideas and transform them into smart, accessible insights Highly readable and deeply engaging, this book helps us understand narcissism and narcissists fully.

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  • á The Narcissist Next Door: Understanding the Monster in Your Family, in Your Office, in Your Bed--in Your World || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Jeffrey Kluger
    465 Jeffrey Kluger
  • thumbnail Title: á The Narcissist Next Door: Understanding the Monster in Your Family, in Your Office, in Your Bed--in Your World || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Jeffrey Kluger
    Posted by:Jeffrey Kluger
    Published :2018-012-10T13:38:33+00:00