Best Read [Napoleon A. Chagnon] Ô Noble Savages: My Life Among Two Dangerous Tribes - The Yanomamo and the Anthropologists || [History Book] PDF ↠
Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM By Napoleon A. Chagnon

The most controversial and famous anthropologist of modern time describes his seminal lifelong research among the Yanomamo Indians of the basin and how his startling observations provoked admiration among many fellow anthropologists and outrage among others.
  • Title: Noble Savages: My Life Among Two Dangerous Tribes - The Yanomamo and the Anthropologists
  • Author: Napoleon A. Chagnon
  • ISBN: 9780684855103
  • Page: 169
  • Format: Hardcover

Comments

William1 Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
A fascinating book about the "fierce people." The Yanomamö—a "demographically pristine" stone age population occupying a remote expanse of the Orinoco straddling Brazil and Venezuela. The author spent 30 years with them and came back with robust comparative data that will never be equaled, since, the Yamamanö are now acculturated. That is, their violent but pristine way of life is now mixed irrevocably with that of our world.Three quarters of the book is about the tribes themselves. Chagnon [...]
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Louise Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
This is two books in one. The first describes the author's field research and how he lived among the Yanomamo people in the 1960's and 70's. The second is the reaction his work stirred up and Chagnon's defense against attacks on his work, methods and ethics by anthropologists, missionaries and advocates for indigenous people.If the first part of the book stood on its own I would not be reviewing the book in such a skeptical fashion. While there are many interesting stories the information given [...]
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Diogenes Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
“The probability is close to zero that any contemporary anthropologist will have the opportunity to be the first representative of his or her culture to contact tribal peoples who have never seen outsiders before or who have had fleeting encounters with outsiders. In the Basin, for example, remaining uncontacted tribes consist of a few families who are hiding out in the remaining hidden pockets of unexplored difficult-to-reach areas. The Yanomamö were the last large, multivillage tribe left [...]
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Nancy Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
This book is mostly about Chagnon's research and experience with the Yanomamo in South America. While I found it hard to connect with Yanomamo life, I had to admire Chagnon for his work gathering data in very difficult surroundings. Because the final chapters chronicle his squabbles with postmodern academics, some reviewers have panned the book. It is hard for me to take postmodern attitudes seriously (see Postmodern Pooh) so it was easy for me to "side with" Chagnon.
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Ummia Gina Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
This book was excellent. I would recommend it to anyone. This review for it from The New York Times is a pretty good review of it: Review of Noble SavagesBy NICHOLAS WADEPublished: February 18, 2013 An Anthropologist’s War Stories"Noble Savages" By NICHOLAS WADE NOBLE SAVAGES My Life Among Two Dangerous Tribes—The Yanomamö and the Anthropologists By Napoleon A. Chagnon Illustrated. 531 pp. Simon & Schuster. $32.50.What were our early ancestors really like as they accomplished thetransit [...]
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Sandra Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
Essentially two books in one, the first part being an autoethnograpical account of the authors time spent working with various Yanomamo tribes in the region of Venezuela (mixed in with some ethnographic data every once in a while) and the last part (the last few chapters of this large book) discussing the feuds between Chagon and those members of the anthropology community who did not validate his sociobiological research methods and conclusions (mainly that the main reason for warfare among th [...]
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Liz Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
I read this book following my reading of Anne Patchett's "State of Wonder" which is set in the rainforest.This is a big book and is in two part. Part 1 is about the Yamamomo tribe and their way of life as observed by Chagnon over 30 years of study which included long periods living with them. Part 2 is a chronicle of the difficulty he faced with fellow anthropologists. What I found amazing is that many anthropologists do not consider that their field is a science but rather consider their role [...]
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Megan Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
This had the potential to be a great book and missed the mark by a mile. It needed an editor to tighten up the narrative which was repetitive and disorganized. Chagon is clearly very impressed with his own work and spends much of the book expressing how his ideas are better than everyone else's. I skipped the last two chapters which appeared to be tales of academic infighting. The Yanomamo lost out on this one.
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Tia Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
This guy seemed kind of like a jerk. His insights about the Yamomano were fascinating, but his eagerness to make sweeping generalizations about the motivations of humans in some primitive, evolutionary past put me off. While the Yamomano surely do provide some insight, there are many other societies on Earth that seem equally cut off from civilization and yet don't seem to have the same societal structure. Also, the griping about his fights with other anthropologists was boring.
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Amanda Fleming Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
I received this book from First Reads. It was a lovely, yet long read. A very interesting and detailed description of life as we have never known it, and never will again. What I found intriguing was the inside look into the academic field of anthropology in the mid 20th century. I never imagined there to be so much corruption among academics. This book was a learning experience in many ways.
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Chris Jones Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
This should be a thrilling account of an anthropologists encounter with a preneolithic people but unfortunately is written quite dryly. This could be a five star book if just the writing had a bit more life.That being said it is still a good introduction to the Yanomami and the seriously vitriolic controversy caused by this author's time with them.
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Dave Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
I abandoned this book about a third of the way through. I found the author self absorbed and quite annoying to be honest. He seems more interested in pushing his narrow purview on modern anthropology than in telling the tale. It should have, could have been a very interesting book. Pity.
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Nick Ziegler Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
The controversy over Chagnon and, perhaps at a lower pitch, his work, is (everyone who comments on it likes to say) "done to death." Here's an abnormally judicious account that does the important work of separating out all the discrete strands of the matter:embodiedknowledgesMy positive rating by no means puts me in the "Chagnon camp," let alone the "sociobiology camp," but it does indicate that I think some of the fair methodological criticisms aimed at Chagnon are not fatal. I also object to t [...]
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Frank Stein Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
Napolean Chagnon is the most controversial anthropologist living today. His work on the Venezuelan Yanomamo tribe in the 1960s, then one of the last untouched tribes in the world, demonstrated that violence and warfare were endemic to their lives. He estimated that a large proportion of all make deaths came from violence, and that 20% of wives were abducted. He argued that the more kills a tribal member had, the more children he had, and that access to fertile females was one of the most common [...]
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Steve Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
Parts of this book are excellent, and the subject matter is fascinating. Chagnon's experiences and observations are unique. My only complaint is that the writing is often repetitive; Chagnon will make the same point again and again from one paragraph to the next. Another example of poor editing, I think. I'll admit that in the end, I was jumping around and skimming passages looking for the main points. Seems like this could have been fixed easily, and a tighter, more readable manuscript could ha [...]
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Sarah Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
Fascinating book! I'm so glad I read this because it destroys some of the stereotypes I've had of "noble savages" and of "scholarship." Chagnon is a wonderful writer. His descriptions of his adventures among the jungle people are understated and unhyped, which is refreshing. The second half of the book is about what happened to Chagnon in the scholarly world, which turns out to be just as savage, maybe moreso, than the jungle. The author seems to have been better equipped psychologically to hand [...]
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Sabine Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
There were some really good and surprising passages in this book that make you think about all the things we take for granted in our civilization. It offered a candid and fascinating view into a whole different world. However, the book was interspersed with rambling passages about all the people who had wronged the author. It sounded a bit self-righteous and defensive at times and it was a shame when you were torn in the middle of a paragraph from the fascinating description of Yanomamo warfare [...]
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Sarah Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
DNF. This isn't so much about the tribe or even about the author's experiences in the field as it was comments about academia. Maybe it changes farther into the book, but after a few chapters, there's still quite a lot of commentary on who said what and how that academic turned out to be wrong, etc. Reads like academic history with a touch of highschool cheerleader.
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Jesse Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
very strange conclusion from economist review:"But Mr Chagnon’s central claim—that Yanomamo violence is evidence of humanity’s brutal origins—can be dismissed out of hand. Men may have evolved to rape and murder, but he has not demonstrated it. The Yanomamo are not hunter-gatherers, but live by clearing forest and planting crops, a way of life that is at most 15,000 years old, an eye’s blink in evolutionary terms."economist review does not address the deeply disturbing evidence present [...]
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Bob Wrathall Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
I started reading this book totally ignorant of the controversy surrounding Chagnon, between his sociobiology supporters and his cultural anthropologist detractors. The outlines of the conflict developed rather slowly and became vivid in the last half of the book where Chagnon defends himself, very ably, against his slanderers. I was captivated by this man's determination to study this group of people. The first part of this memoir describes his life among the Yanomamo Indians. He starts with hi [...]
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Michael Kich Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
I thought this book was interesting for both of its premises, although I have to admit that the first half to 2/3 of the book was more interesting to me because it directly concerned Chagnon's experiences living among the Yanomamö of Venezuela and Brazil, mostly at the cusp of their contact with broader global society. He demolishes any remaining belief we might have in the idea from J.J. Rousseau about the mythical perfection of the "noble savage." His book is entitled Nobles Savages because h [...]
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David Harris Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
Every once in a while, you hear about uncontacted tribes in the , New Guinea or Indonesia. For a long time, I've been interested in reading detailed accounts of what life is like for these isolated groups. Chagnon's account does not disappoint. The book contains a wealth of interesting stories about his travels among the various villages, what the villages are like, how they get too large and break up into smaller groups from time to time, and what it's like to live in this environment.I tend to [...]
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Claire Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
I received Noble Savages as part of a giveaway.Napoleon Chagnon first visited the Yanomamo tribes, scattered around the Brazilian-Venezuelan border, in the 1960s. Over the course of three decades and numerous additional site visits, he has conducted both qualitative and quantitative research on life within this little-known, stateless tribe, largely removed from modern political authority. The conclusions Chagnon reaches about basic human nature have made him many enemies among the academic com [...]
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Claire Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
I received Noble Savages as part of a giveaway.Napoleon Chagnon first visited the Yanomamo tribes, scattered around the Brazilian-Venezuelan border, in the 1960s. Over the course of three decades and numerous additional site visits, he has conducted both qualitative and quantitative research on life within this little-known, stateless tribe, largely removed from modern political authority. The conclusions Chagnon reaches about basic human nature have made him many enemies among the academic com [...]
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Don O'goodreader Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
Two books in one an enlightening history of the Yanomamo and a sad memoir of the anthropologist who spent his life studying them.Noble Savages by Napolean Chagnon covers the author's three decades with the Yanomamo, a people living on the border of Venezuela and Brazil, some of whom who when he arrived in 1964 had never had any contact with the outside world. He lived with them long periods during his annual research trips. He learned their language and they became trusted friends.They play tri [...]
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Stephen J Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
A fascinating book about an intrepid anthropologist who lived with remote tribes in the basin for 20+ years and documented the important role competition for women plays in the incessant warfare among the tribes. Just as fascinating is the documentation of the anthropology communities rejection of his findings because of ideological beliefs. This insightful book will most likely change the readers view of human nature and the world we live in. A remarkable story.Merged review:A fascinating book [...]
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Tim Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
Napoleon Chagnon provides a concise picture of his years of field research over decades with the Indian tribe that are the main subjects of his studies. It's an interesting read and his recall of anecdotes lends itself well to the overall picture he paints. These parts of the book are well written and draw the reader into the world inhabited by Chagnon and the adopted tribe during his field trips. When he delves into the reception of his theories by his peers one can feel the obviously deep sca [...]
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S.m. Elliott Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
Chagnon is, as always, engaging and compelling. He saves the "good stuff" - his response to various accusations and allegations - for the last two chapters, but he does have a few explosive allegations of his own seeded throughout the book. While I'm not ready to decide if he's a white devil or not, it's difficult to judge him too harshly after reading this book. He undoubtedly faced many dangers during his fieldwork, and some of the charges leveled at him by Patrick Tierney and others are simpl [...]
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Ian Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
Based on many of the reviews I see here, I'm wondering if a lot of folks weren't really well acquainted with Chagnon before reading. If you didn't take any anthropology classes in college or aren't married to an anthropologist (I'm both) it may be hard for you to understand the high stakes of this book. Admittedly, Chagnon and his editors do kind of take it for granted that you care. Anyone coming up in anthropology in the 90s or 2000s was presented Chagnon as perhaps the worst anthropologist al [...]
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Alina Nov 22, 2018 - 11:21 AM
A fascinating and important book. Chagnon's account of his time among the Yanomamo of the forest is an absorbing portrait of a tribal people little touched by Western civilization. His struggle to overcome a witch hunt intended to suppress his research is a wake up call to anyone who cares about the integrity of the scientific process. In Chagnon's case the facts eventually won, but he certainly was made to suffer for defying politically correct orthodoxy. We're seeing more and more evidence of [...]
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Noble Savages: My Life Among Two Dangerous Tribes - The Yanomamo and the Anthropologists By Napoleon A. Chagnon The most controversial and famous anthropologist of modern time describes his seminal lifelong research among the Yanomamo Indians of the basin and how his startling observations provoked admiration among many fellow anthropologists and outrage among others.

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  • Best Read [Napoleon A. Chagnon] Ô Noble Savages: My Life Among Two Dangerous Tribes - The Yanomamo and the Anthropologists || [History Book] PDF ↠
    169 Napoleon A. Chagnon
  • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Napoleon A. Chagnon] Ô Noble Savages: My Life Among Two Dangerous Tribes - The Yanomamo and the Anthropologists || [History Book] PDF ↠
    Posted by:Napoleon A. Chagnon
    Published :2018-08-26T11:21:30+00:00