Bend Sinister
Vladimir Nabokov
Unlimited [Horror Book] º Bend Sinister - by Vladimir Nabokov ✓
Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM By Vladimir Nabokov

The first novel Nabokov wrote while living in America and the most overtly political novel he ever wrote, Bend Sinister is a modern classic While it is filled with veiled puns and characteristically delightful wordplay, it is, first and foremost, a haunting and compelling narrative about a civilized man caught in the tyranny of a police state It is first and foremost aThe first novel Nabokov wrote while living in America and the most overtly political novel he ever wrote, Bend Sinister is a modern classic While it is filled with veiled puns and characteristically delightful wordplay, it is, first and foremost, a haunting and compelling narrative about a civilized man caught in the tyranny of a police state It is first and foremost a compelling narrative about a civilized man and his child caught up in the tyranny of a police state Professor Adam Krug, the country s foremost philosopher, offers the only hope of resistance to Paduk, dictator and leader of the Party of the Average Man In a folly of bureaucratic bungling and ineptitude, the government attempts to co opt Krug s support in order to validate the new regime.
  • Title: Bend Sinister
  • Author: Vladimir Nabokov
  • ISBN: 9780307787880
  • Page: 419
  • Format: Paperback

Comments

Jim Fonseca Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
This novel is an early work by Nabokov, published in 1947, eight years before Lolita. It was published at a time when, the Editor’s Preface tells us, Nabokov was acquiring a reputation among “discerning readers.” The title comes from heraldry meaning a leftward tilting band on a coat of arms (tilted like the backslash in an http address).The action takes place in a vaguely East European country that has elected a dictator. Twice the author uses the analogy of a snowball rolling downhill wi [...]
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Manny Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
It's interesting to compare Bend Sinister with 1984. (Nabokov didn't much like Orwell, and thought he was a hack). Orwell's take on totalitarianism, is, roughly, that it's evil. Nabokov's is more that it's terminally stupid. Even when the rulers of the State would actually prefer to get things right, they've fucked up their minds with nonsensical ideology to the point where they're no longer capable of coherent thought. I wonder whether Nabokov wasn't closer to the truth. In the end, the Soviet [...]
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Paquita Maria Sanchez Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Beautiful, then grueling. The first half is stellar, the second half simultaneously disturbingly fascinating and immensely frustrating. Jogging the last lap of the book feels like running with a ferocious wind beating against you, largely due to the otherwise elegant prose getting a but clunky. Despite what is unarguably a beautiful stretch of text, I found myself wanting to slug it down like ice cold water at 4 am after a bender. I felt immense guilt in doing so, as I know from various quotes a [...]
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nostalgebraist Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
The more Nabokov I read, the more I feel that he wrote a set of three very good novels that make sense as novels -- Lolita, Pale Fire, and Ada -- and that everything outside that central trilogy consists of more unformed, less intelligible versions of the same material he used in the trilogy, awaiting a context that would make sense of it.If you read the trilogy first, then reading more Nabokov is a very strange experience. The trilogy flaunts its unreliable narrators and appears, transparently, [...]
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Ian "Marvin" Graye Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Sinistral JestSeveral GR reviews call this novel a mess. I think this is an understatement: I’d go as far as to call it a quagmire. It takes just 200 pages to bog the reader down, although the process starts and succeeds much earlier than that. As Nabokov said of James Joyce’s “Finnegan’s Wake”, it’s “formless and dull”, “a frightful bore”, “a cold pudding of a book”, and “a tragic failure”. This is second rate Nabokov. Even masters have their off days.Paradoxically, [...]
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Szplug Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Yeah, I don't have any idea what to say here. So much beautiful writing that time and again I wanted to freeze the moment and savor against the lengthening shadows the sublime and playful wit that infuses this silky, slinky prose, the arch elegance drawn taut and set to run with the wind. The man had a gift, an effortless, supple skill with the pen that is a pleasure to behold; too pleasurable perhaps—for as another reviewer astutely points out, it is written so beautifully as to be distractin [...]
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Darwin8u Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
“Nothing on earth really matters, there is nothing to fear, and death is but a question of style, a mere literary device, a musical resolution.” ― Vladimir Nabokov, Bend SinisterMy bookshelf is growing bigger every day with new fantastic fairytales of fascism, dynamic doggerels of dystopia. Of course there is Orwell's seminal 1984 and Huxley's Brave New World. There are also (move aside high-school dystopias) Koestler's Darkness at Noon, Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and almost all of Kafka [...]
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Anthony Vacca Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
And here's Nabokov's stab at the dystopian novel. Not a fan of Orwell's portrayal of oppressive regimes (although this could be some eventual jealousy on Vlad's part since his book came out two years prior and was not instantly hailed a prophetic classic like 1984), Nabokov goes for broke showing these tinkertoy political powers as nothing more than bilious mixtures of pettiness, stupidity and brute nature. Nabokov swears (lies) in the amusingly/annoyingly arrogant forward of the 1961 edition th [...]
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Libbie Hawker (L.M. Ironside) Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Let me get this out of the way first: I have a lot of respect for 1984. It's a good book. It's a great book, in fact. George Orwell was a master at his craft.But Bend Sinister is so amazing, so delicious and so emotionally deep that as good as 1984 is, Bend Sinister still manages to feel like "1984 done right." Nabokov uses the full force of his incredibly nuanced, unique command of language to paint a picture of a totalitarian regime. His images are beautiful and stunning, and the story at the [...]
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Edward Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Another reviewer here has described Bend Sinister as “a hot mess”, which so perfectly and economically encapsulates the matter that I am tempted to just leave it there. What follows is largely an attempt to restate this in somewhat more refined terms, and to shroud myself in protective caveats and disclaimers, so as to guard against accusations of boorishness for failing to award at least four stars to a work of the great master.Therefore I present the following as evidence in my defense: I [...]
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Meriam Kharbat Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
One would think that after the horror of the war had ended, people would have an optimistic vision of the future, that artists would see la vie en rose. However, when you read the books published in the same year the song came out 1947, they all seem to share this horrible idea of what is to come. Bend Sinister isn't any different.As Nabokov puts it: “People are made to live together, to do business with one another, to talk, to sing songs together, to meet in clubs and stores, and street corn [...]
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AC Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
I have not finished yet -- and I don't know if I will then actually write a review when I do. After all, what can I say or add or why should I comment on works of art? Pieces of crap deserve comment. It's obligatory. Works on objective material -- books on history or sociology or entomology or prosody -- can be commented upon or corrected or endorsed; but ?-- well, that's just me, maybe.Anyway -- this is a truly magnificent book. Don't be mislead by some of the less than enthusiastic ratings off [...]
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Inderjit Sanghera Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
On the face of it, Bend Sinister is an unusual novel. Nabokov, a self-proclaimed politically apathetic writer, writes a novel about the rise of newly formed dictatorship in a fictitious country. Yet, despite this, Bend Sinister is fundamentally not a political book, or even a book about politics per se, but is more a book about love, or in this case, paternal love, and just as the object of that paternal love dies and is removed from the novel, so the narrator himself, in a miracle of involution [...]
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Cody Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
(Lightning Review)The best is the unravel. You'll know it when you get to it. Hi-five to Vacca, he'll get this when he reads it. Revelation: all is not what it seems.Lightning review grade: sourdough
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Madison Santos Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Looks like I might be getting my first publishing credit from the MLA this winter for a new set of annotations for Bend Sinister. Will update accordingly!
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William Herschel Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
oh, Nabokov.Your prose is extremely sexy. And I don't mean you're always describing Lolitas and Adas and the like, but the way you describe and isolate the little every-days and play them every-which-way and turn them inside-out and make them oh-so-clever. You have written the most sensual things I've ever had the pleasure of reading often without the shedding of a single garment.And this, a novel of governing gone terribly wrong in the form of political dystopia wherein to achieve true human en [...]
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Lee Kofman Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Quite a few times as I read this novel I felt stupid; for the life of me I couldn’t understand what Nabokov was on about, particularly in the passages pertaining to the work of the main character, the philosopher Krug. Then at other times, particularly in the last quarter of the book, I was so engrossed by the narrative that I forgot where I was. This novel was a hard work but mostly in the good sense of this expression. As I read it I felt this was the right book at the right time to read pol [...]
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Claudia Serbanescu Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
''Blazon de bastard'' ( sau ''Bend sinister'') conține o lume distopică, în care veți regăsi metodele prin care se instalează totalitarismul într-o societate. Veți afla (dacă nu ați trăit în România înainte de 1989) cum dictatura de inspirație sovietică și nazistă confiscă, modelează sau distruge individul liber-cugetător în scopul nivelării conștiințelor și al instaurării controlului total și definitiv asupra unei comunități. O lume în care viața este posibilă d [...]
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Jenelle Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
what'll happen to love, interior life, and the butterflies in a dystopian world??I'm always charmed by Nabokov's willingness to bore & lose his reader, and this one, his first American novel, is particularly full of tricks. partly they're there to suggest the confusion & bewilderment felt under an absurd totalitarian rule, but partly Nab's just playing. it's like writing in English is still so novel & thrilling for him! even thicker than normal with poetry, puns & reference, it's [...]
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Jon Zelazny Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Gave up on page 40. Hideous writing, hopelessly repellant characters, no apparent story.
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wally Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
this here ise second? third? from nabokov i will reade previous some time ago. this one sounds like a hootere is an editor's preface that is short and sweetd glowingd there is an introduction by the author that iswelleither one, full of himselforke charlie brown's teacheraw! mwaw mwaw! mwa maaa mwaw!nobokovling the reader about all of the rich detail he installed for our reading pleasurel of it interesting, to be fair. adds to the temptation factorginsan oblong puddle inset in the coarse asphalt [...]
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Simon Hollway Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
A mixed bag. Boyd claims that Nabokov would spend 6 months preparing a novel in his head and only after it had settled and formed metaphysically would he put pen to paper. Often during this transcription, the next cab would pull up to the rank and Vlad was already assimilating the following book. This is the only way I can explain Bend Sinister. Lolita had elbowed its brilliance into his head whilst he was pulling Bend Sinister together and he just had to get shot of it. The similarly themed Inv [...]
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K.A. Laity Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
I was actually reading Pale Fire when I decided to switch to Bend Sinister, mostly because I decided I would probably have to buy my own copy of Pale Fire because I was making too many notes and it would be easier to just put them in the book and that wouldn't be good to do with the library's copy.I learn all my new words from Nabokov.I had already written down tons of new words from Pale Fire, but I found myself writing quotes from Bend Sinister instead. I alluded in my Hamlet review to Ember's [...]
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Adam Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
This read much like a pretentious version of a dystopia, like Orwell if he were trying to please a collegiate, indie rock crowd. But, then again, Nabokov is never afraid to shy away from writing something that would prove exactly how brilliant he was. And he was smart; his capacity for learning and using language is impressive to say the least. He's a brilliant writer, too. There's just this semi-bearable attitude of condescension that works sometimes and really frustrates at others. There are s [...]
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Lark Benobi Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Nabokov here writes in a post-modern, self-referential, metafictional style, using techniques that when used by other authors have made me feel detached from fictional outcomes.But with Nabokov these self-referential devices work to draw me in, rather than keep me detached. I don't know quite how he did that. I cared deeply for these characters, even as I was being constantly reminded they were nothing more than lines of words on a page. I had the same impression when reading Nabokov's short sto [...]
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Adam Floridia Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
As he points out in his introduction, Nabokov fills his book with so many obscure allusions, subtle themes/motifs, and playfully linguistic choices. Most of these must be lost on most readers (myself included!), which is, perhaps, what promoted him to write the explanatory introduction. It was interesting to read because it really gives the reader the sense that Nabokov is upset that his readers aren't brilliant enough to discern everything he has embedded in the novel. He really is a genius.I l [...]
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Mark Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
i can find in this book the particles that might have inspired pynchon and coover and others of that generation along the cusp of modern to post-modern american writing. big particles, smears of hilarity and chokes of sadness. what i can't feel is the balance of it all, though, to make it into a real story.
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Gabriel Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Dear Vladimir,"Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta." (Lolita, p. 9)With these words you drew me into a story of passion, obsession, and perversity. You had me at the first sentence. I was yours for the entirety of the book (even the bits towards the end that kind of dragged). You played with language, used it in such new and beautiful ways. It was a j [...]
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Ted Prokash Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
Nabokov might be the best. No one else has ever been so unabashedly erudite yet so eminently readable. Entertaining. Such a pompous ass but so good. Professor Krug, here, as Kinbote in Pale Fire and the old lech in Lolita are characters no one else could have written. Bend is Vlad's most overtly political book, though the political situation here more provides the context for the story than leads to any political statement. Unless the statement is, whatever political construct man might conceive [...]
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Lee Dec 15, 2018 - 22:24 PM
This is the second book by Nabokov that I have read (the first being Lolita) whilst I enjoyed Bend Sinister it doesn't hit the heights that Lolita did.Its quite strange because for what should be such a complex plot a lot of the time it seems to skirt over it, there was an underlying humour to the Ekwilists that I did appreciate and the scene at the start of the book when Krug was trying to cross the bridge was brilliant.The ending was a real shocker for me, I wasn't expecting that to happen at [...]
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Bend Sinister By Vladimir Nabokov The first novel Nabokov wrote while living in America and the most overtly political novel he ever wrote, Bend Sinister is a modern classic While it is filled with veiled puns and characteristically delightful wordplay, it is, first and foremost, a haunting and compelling narrative about a civilized man caught in the tyranny of a police state It is first and foremost aThe first novel Nabokov wrote while living in America and the most overtly political novel he ever wrote, Bend Sinister is a modern classic While it is filled with veiled puns and characteristically delightful wordplay, it is, first and foremost, a haunting and compelling narrative about a civilized man caught in the tyranny of a police state It is first and foremost a compelling narrative about a civilized man and his child caught up in the tyranny of a police state Professor Adam Krug, the country s foremost philosopher, offers the only hope of resistance to Paduk, dictator and leader of the Party of the Average Man In a folly of bureaucratic bungling and ineptitude, the government attempts to co opt Krug s support in order to validate the new regime.

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  • Unlimited [Horror Book] º Bend Sinister - by Vladimir Nabokov ✓
    419 Vladimir Nabokov
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    Posted by:Vladimir Nabokov
    Published :2018-09-18T22:24:33+00:00